July 5, 2020 ~ Sh PINEHAS. M SABA.

Gabriel A Shrem - גבריאל אברהם שרים

Biography

Born in Cairo in 1916, Gabriel A. Shrem immigrated to the United States in 1930.  During his youth, he lived with his maternal uncle, Abraham Chehebar (father to Gabriel Chehebar), who raised him and taught him pizmonim.

Upon his arrival to New York, he quickly moved down south to join his family in business; temporarily settling in Macon, Georgia, where he married Rachel Shrem.  In 1941, Gabriel and his family permanently moved to Bensonhurst in Brooklyn, New York.   He was offered the position of Cantor at the Betesh Synagogue (“Knis Betesh”), and several years later, in 1945, he began his tenure at Magen David of 67th Street, where he faithfully served until 1963 as their senior cantor.

In the 1950s, Gabriel teamed up with Mr. Sam Catton of the Sephardic Heritage Foundation to publish the community’s first Pizmonim book, “Shir Ushbaha Hallel VeZimrah,” and several years later he edited a daily prayer book “Bet Yosef Ohel Abraham Gabriel.”

In 1963, he was offered a position to serve as cantor at Congregation B’nai Yosef, formally called Magen David (originally located on East 4th Street and Quentin Road), where he served until his passing.  In the mid to late 1970s, Gabriel accepted a position of Professor of Sephardic Hazzanut in the Cantorial Training Institute of Yeshiva University, where he taught classes every Monday night for 4 years.

A proud father of five children, and grandfather of sixteen, Gabriel Shrem became a Great Grandfather in 1984 with the birth of David M Betesh.

Mr. Shrem passed on August 22, 1986, while on a trip to Israel. He was buried on Mount Olives in Jerusalem.

Gabriel A Shrem & David M Betesh

Index of Recordings

Section Pizmon Page Song CommentaryRecordings Application
Baqashot 10 20 ה' בוקר Shelomo Ibn Gabirol Maqam Hoseni Hoseni. Psalms 5:4. Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Baqashot 17 26 מה נכבד Mordekhai Labaton Maqam Saba Saba. Written by H Mordekhai Labaton (1780-1869). About the importance and centrality of Shabbat. Saba. Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Baqashot 24 31 אשתבח בתהלות Abraham Sitehon Maqam Iraq Maqam Iraq. Written by H Abraham Sittehon (?-1816). Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
שמחים
Baqashot 31 39 יודוך מלך Mordechai Abadi Maqam Rahawi Nawah Written by H Mordekhai Abadi (1826-1883). Rahawi Nawah. Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Baqashot 32 40 'אנכי שמי ה David Dayan Maqam Hoseni Alluding to theTen Commandments. Hoseni. G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Baqashot 33 41 עורי נצורה Menashe Sitehon Maqam Rahawi Nawah Nawah. Written by H Menashe Sittehon (?-1876). Alludes the different Amidah of Shabbat blessings (Arbit, Shaharit, Musaf, and Mincha). By Menashe Sitehon. In honor of Ezra Rabia. Rahawi Nawah. Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ראו בנים
Baqashot 34 42 רם אור גדול Raphael Tabbush Maqam Rahawi Nawah Written by H Rephael Tabbush (1830-1918). Rahawi Nawah. Tabbush Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נשמת
Baqashot 37 45 מלא פי שירה Raphael Tabbush Maqam Ajam Ajam. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Baqashot 38 46 אשא לבי Eliahu Sasson Maqam Hoseni Written by H Eliahou Sasson (?-1869). Hoseni. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
ממצרים
Baqashot 41 48 אני אספר Mordechai Abadi Maqam Rast Written by H Mordekhai Abadi (1826-1883). Discusses the 39 Melakhot (forms of work prohibited on Shabbat). Rast. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
שמחים
Baqashot 42 51 מהללך ורוב גדלך Mordechai Abadi Maqam Rast Written by H Mordekhai Abadi (1826-1883). Lists the seven heavens. Rast. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נשמת
Baqashot 43 52 משמים שלום לעם Mordechai Abadi Maqam Rast Written by H Mordekhai Abadi (1826-1883). Rast. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
נקדישך
Baqashot 44 53 רונו ושבחו לאל Raphael Tabbush Maqam Rahawi Nawah Composed by H Rephael Tabbush. Lahn: Ya Badri Toman Roqli. Rahawi Nawah. Attiah Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Baqashot 53 61 בר יוחאי נמשחת Shimon Labi Maqam Sigah The pizmon "Bar Yohai" (SIGAH, page 61), is written by H Simeon Labi (b. Spain, 1486- d. Tripoli, Libya,1585), in honor of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yohai, a 2nd century Tannaitic sage strongly associated with Jewish mysticism. Rabbi Simeon Labi, whose name forms the acrostic at the beginning of each stanza, was en-route to the Land of Israel, but on his way, he was stopped in Tripoli. Upon seeing the community's low spiritual situation, he decided to stay there his entire life, where he contributed to their revival of Jewish life. Excluding the first line, which is meant to be a repeating verse, there are ten stanzas to this song; all filled with rich allusions to Bar Yohai's life. In our tradition, there is a slow melody and a fast "Beirut" melody to this song. During the Baqashot of Shabbat, we use the slow melody for the first and last stanzas, and the fast melody for all the middle stanzas. On Lag La'Omer, which is the anniversary of his death, the slow melody of this pizmon is applied to Naqdishakh. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Baqashot 59 67 אדון יחיד Menashe Sitehon Maqam Sigah Alludes to the Ten Sefirot that God used to create the world. Written by Menashe Sittehon (?-1876), in honor of Isaac Harari. Sigah. Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
שמחים
Baqashot 60 69 יושב תהלות Yosef Sitehon Maqam Sigah Sigah or Bayat. Written by H Yosef Sittehon (1813-?). Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
ממצרים
Baqashot 61 69 ידיד נפש Elazar Azkari Maqam Sigah 16th century. He defines this piyut as “a supplication for union and the desire of love”. Sigah. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
ממצרים
Baqashot 65 72 יה אל גדול ונאדר Raphael Tabbush Maqam Saba This pizmon first appeared in Tabbush's 1888 pizmonim book. It is listed as Maqam Hijaz. It was written in honour of H Yaaqob Barzani. Saba. Aharon Rahamim Hares Baqashot Manuscript, 1917 G. Shrem
שמחים
Baqashot 66 73 אדון עולם אשר מלך Maqam Nahwand God's power over the world. Nahwand. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
G. Shrem - Odekha
G. Shrem
כתר
Mossaei Shabbat 67 76 במוצאי יום מנוחה Yaakob Manoi Very old pizmon. Found in Mahzor Vitry. Its composer is Ya'acob Manoi, whose name is spelled in the acrostic beginning with the second stanza. It begins with a plea that God gather Israel together from exile during the coming week. It asks that He redeem Israel from its current state of degradation and bring it to the Temple. Closes with a prayer for Elijah the prophet, traditionally the herald of the Messiah. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ראו בנים
Mossaei Shabbat 68 77 חדש ששוני Talks about Eliyahu HaNabi. The song is accrostic. Asks for fulfillment of national aspirations and asks for Eliyahu to announce the redemption. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ראו בנים
Mossaei Shabbat 69 78 אגיל ואשמח Elazar According to traditon, Eliyahu will be the one to announce the Messiah, and it has been promised to Israel that the announcement won't come on a Friday night/Shabbat. Therefore, it is a custom to start and ask/wait for the Messiah starting Saturday night from the moment that Shabbat is over. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat 70 78 משביח שאון ימים "Mashbiah Sheon Yamim" is an allusion to Psalm 65:8. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat 71 80 שיר אענה G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ראו בנים
Mossaei Shabbat 72 81 אל אליהו Abraham Ibn Ezra There are many different melodies to this song. Eliyahu, who will be the announcer of the redemption will hopefully come on a Saturday night right after Shabbat and in zechut (merit) that we have observed the Shabbat. The pizmon ends in prayer. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat הבדלה 82 אליהו הנביא The pizmon, which we have no melody for, is devoted exclusively to the praise of Elijah the prophet. There are 22 stanzas that begin with the word "ish"(man). The second word for each verse is an alphabetic acrostic. G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat הבדלה 83 אלהינו Prayer for the new week. G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat הבדלה 86 ויתן לך Verses from the Tanakh of blessings (for the new week). G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat 73 88 המבדיל בין קודש Yisshaq Kattan Hatam Sofer writes that this pizmon was originally to be recited for the conclusion of Yom Kippur due to its frequent reference to forgiveness. Each stanza ends with the word "lailah" (night). G. Shrem
ראו בנים
Mossaei Shabbat 74 90 אמר ה' ליעקב Follows the Alef Bet. Nearly every verse is a Biblical allusion. The general theme is that Israel, based on Biblical assurances, should have no fear that it will be doomed. First seen in Aram Soba Mahzor in 1527. G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat 75 91 על בית זה ויושבהו Ben Ish Hai G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat 76 92 חביב אללה אליהו Arabic Arabic. Used for Semehim Besetam on Shabbat Pinehas. G. Shrem
שמחים
Mossaei Shabbat 77 94 אליהו בל כרמל Judeo-Arabic. Mentions the different locations that were the sister communities of Aleppo. Jobar is a place where Eliyahu HaNavi hid. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Mossaei Shabbat 77.01 95 שיר למעלות Bayat. G. Shrem
Petihot 105 106 בן אדם G. Shrem
Rast 110 110 ידך עשת Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
Rast 114 111 אחבירה לך G. Shrem
ואני תפלתי
Rast 118 113 ישיר ישראל ברננים Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G Shrem 2
Rast 120 114 אתה אל טוב G. Shrem
Rast 121 114 דלני מיד הזרי G. Shrem
קדיש
Rast 123 115 יה אל מגן Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
נשמת
Rast 124 116 אתה יודע Raphael Tabbush G. Shrem
נקדישך
Rast 125 116 רפא צירי Raphael Tabbush Refa Siri is a special composition written by H Raphael Tabbush A"H. The melody is attributed to a Judeo-Spanish song entitled "Triste Vida" (A Sad Life). The song has an acrostic of "Refael" and has been viewed as a prayer for good health. The first stanza of the song recognizes God as the ultimate doctor and healer. The song also contains a prayer for God to open the gates of mercy and to send freedom to our nation. The pizmon was used by H Moshe Ashear A"H (d.1940) for the PIZMON SEFER TORAH in 1940 for Shabbat Vayera because Abraham is thought to have been recovering from the Berit Mila at the opening of the perasha. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Rast 127 117 חי הזן לכל תמיד Raphael Tabbush In honor of the wedding of Tabbush's student, Hayyim Tawil. G. Shrem
קדיש
Rast 130 119 הנה זה עומד G. Shrem
ממצרים
Rast 132 120 יחיד נורא Raphael Tabbush This jovial pizmon (RAST, page 120), composed by H Raphael Antebi Tabbush (deceased December 1918) of Aleppo, Syria, is one of the most important and popular songs for the festival of Pesah. There are four stanzas in this pizmon; corresponding to the four letter of name of God (Tetragrammaton). Within each stanza, there are multiple rhyming clauses. Although the melody of this song should not be applied to any of the pieces of prayers, this pizmon is used for the PIZMON SEFER TORAH (typically on Shabbat HaHodesh or 1-2 Pesah). Many aspects of the month of Nisan, including the Haggadah and the counting of the Omer, are alluded to in this special pizmon. In general, the composer gives praise to God for all of His kindness to mankind, and specifically to the Jewish nation for the Exodus from Egypt and the splitting of the sea. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
Rast 133 120 אל נורא פי ינוב Raphael Tabbush סימן רפאל. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
Rast 135 121 מה נעים החתן Raphael Tabbush Hatan. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
ממצרים
Rast 138 123 רם ונעלם Raphael Tabbush סימן רפאל Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שמחים
Rast 141 124 נשאם עד העולם Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript G. Shrem
שמחים
Rast 142 124 אני לשמך אהלל Raphael Tabbush סימן רפאל. Birth of a baby boy and the Pidyon HaBen. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Rast 143 125 רם לחסדך יקוו Raphael Tabbush Same melody as "Frere Jacques" (French). This song is sometimes used for Berit Milah. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
ממצרים
Rast 145 126 יה שמע תפלה Moses Ashear Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Rast 146 127 מגן ישעי Moses Ashear This pizmon, "Magen Yish'ee" (RAST, page 127), is composed by H Moses Ashear (acrostic: Moshe Hazaq), in honor of the wedding of Mr Ezra Obadia Labaton In Brooklyn, NY, circa 1920-25. The melody of this song is from the Dutch folk song entitled "Trip a Trop a Tronjes." As the melody sounds, this is a very happy song that celebrates the occasion of a wedding in the Labaton family. The last stanza contains a reference to H Mordekhai Labaton (1780-1869); the great Aleppian Rabbi and patriarch of this family. The last stanza also contains a prayer to return to the sanctuary of the Temple and to rebuild the city of Zion (Jerusalem). This melody is commonly applied to Shav'at Aniyim on weeks of Maqam RAST. On December 7, 2013, two days after the passing of Rabbi Ezra Labaton, Rabbi of Congregation Magen David of West Deal and the grandson of the individual mentioned above, this song was used as the PIZMON SEFER TORAH in over ten community synagogues as a tribute to the Rabbi. Ashear Manuscript Photograph of Rabbi Dr Ezra Labaton G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Rast 147 127 מלך שוכן Moses Ashear Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Rast 148 128 יחיד אל נורא Moses Ashear Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Rast 149 128 תען לשוני ותגיד Moses Ashear (Maqam Sigah). Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
ממצרים
Rast 151 130 מלכי לעם איתני Moses Ashear For the Hatan (groom), David Abraham Sutton. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
כתר
Rast 152 131 אמר לו גואלי Moses Ashear Ashear. In honour of the groom, Yosef Abraham Me'Eli HaKohen. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Rast 155.04 132b חי אל נאדר Haim S Aboud G. Shrem
Rast 156 133 אור יה עלי ישכון Moses Ashear Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Rast 157 133 מה נאוו רגלי מבשר Moses Ashear Shabbat Qorah. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
כתר
Rast 159 135 ממרום קולם Moses Ashear G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Rast 162 138 דגלך ישא על הרים Moses Ashear Nissim Shaul Dabbah Bar Misvah. February 23, 1935. Leaflet G. Shrem
Rast 167 144 נאוה יפה צביה Ezekiel Hai Albeg Ezekiel Albeg in honor of his daughter, Nina. Birth of a Baby Girl. G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Rast 167.01 144a אנא יה חביבי G. Shrem
167.05 Sample- Rast Maqam Rast G. Shrem- Rast Sample
G. Shrem
דוגמא
Mahour 169 145 חסדך קדם Raphael Tabbush Shabbat Bereshit, the Shalosh Regalim, as well as Purim. Tabbush. Turkish. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Mahour 170 146 אל חון על בת המענה Baby Girl. G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Mahour 173 147 רם בך יגל לבב Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
Mahour 174 147 יחיד האל ומהלל Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
קדיש
Mahour 177 149 חובי מלכי סלח Raphael Tabbush G. Shrem
נשמת
Mahour 178 149 עד ה' אלהיך ונשובה EAttiah Associated with the Days of Repentence. Hamaoui Manuscript Attiah Manuscript Ezra Attia Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Mahour 179 149 ידך תנחני ישראל Yadekha Tanheni is a composition written by the legendary poet and Sephardic rabbi H Israel ben Moshe Najara (1555-1625). Based on the words in Psalms 139:10, the pizmon opens with the words "Your hand will guide me, O Living God, my maker." Throughout his life as a refugee (from Safed, to Damascus, and then to Gaza) filled with personal tragedy (loss of his wife and daughter at an early age), Najara manages to keep his faith in the Almighty and relies on Him for support. Still questions are asked of God, "Where is David? Where is Ben Yishai?" - referencing the Messiah and a promised redemption. In the prayers, H Moshe Ashear uses the MAHOUR melody of this pizmon on Shabbat Toledot for Semehim. This relates to the narrative of this perasha, because we are introduced to Jacob, also named Israel; an individual who also had a very difficult life but nevertheless relies on God for support. Hamaoui Manuscript Attiah Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Mahour 180 150 יתן טל יה מימינו Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
ממצרים
Mahour 181 151 חנון רחם Raphael Tabbush Sukkot. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
פזמון
Mahour 182 151 שבתי שבתי Raphael Tabbush Aseret Yeme Teshuba. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שמחים
Mahour 185 153 אל בחסדך גאלנו Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נשמת
Mahour 186 153 נעימה לי Moses Ashear Eli S Haddad. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Mahour 187 154 ריבה ריבה Moses Ashear Gabe Shasho. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
ואני תפלתי
Mahour 189 155 מלכי צורי יה ידידי Moses Ashear Ezra Obadiah HaKohen. Same tune as the Syrian National Anthem of prior to 1936. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Mahour 191 156 בואי ברנה Moses Ashear Bo'ee BeRina is one of the most beautiful compositions authored by H Moshe Ashear (d. 1940). This pizmon was written for the groom, Seymour Charles Semah, in honor of his wedding to Sara Ashkenazie (daughter of Lulu and Aharon Ashkenazie). The content of the pizmon is written from the point of view of the Hatan talking to his new wife. Although the acrostic is Moshe- named after the author, the names Shaul, Sion, and Semah are alluded to in the first, second, and last stanzas, respectively. The melody of this pizmon is from the Arabic "Hawad Min Hina," sung by Egyptian singer Munira al-Mahdiya (1884-1965). Although this song is only listed in Maqam MAHOUR, Ashear made another melody to this pizmon in Maqam HIJAZ. It is the HIJAZ version that Ashear applied to Semehim on Shabbat Haye Sara in 1940. The pizmon relates to this Torah portion, because Isaac becomes a groom. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G Shrem 2
שמחים
Mahour 192 157 יה הרם סלה Moses Ashear Haddad. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Mahour 193 157 ישירו לאלהים Moses Ashear Shabot. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Mahour 196 161 יה ניבי לך Moses Ashear Isaac Harry Franco wedding. Kislev 1931. Leaflet G. Shrem
Mahour 197 162 האהבה האהבה Ezra Dweck Dweck Bar Misvah. 1962. Leaflet G. Shrem
Mahour 197.1 162a ירחיב יי גבולך ישראל ששון Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
ממצרים
Sasgar 200 163 אסיר ביוקשי Raphael Tabbush Assir El 'Eshq: In 1906, Daoud Hosni was granted the first prize at the Musical Congress in Paris, for the composition of his famous hit "Assir El' Eshq" أســير العــشـق. It is a song that still thrills enthusiasts of Middle-Eastern Music. G. Shrem
קדיש
Ajam 201 165 ישא ברכה Raphael Tabbush This "Golden Song" was written in 1893 in honour of the Jerusalem induction ceremony of Hakham Yaaqob Shaoul Elyashar as Rishon Lesiyon. Tabbush trained two choirs to sings this song at that event. Songs contains allusions to the 10 Sefirot. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
נשמת
Ajam 202 166 מעוז צור "Maoz Sur Yeshuati" (AJAM, page 166), a piece from the 13th century Eastern Europe, is considered the most famous Jewish hymns for the festival of Hanukkah. The name of the song, meaning "Strong Rock, My Salvation," is a reference to God, and the song, throughout its 6 stanzas (acrostic: מרדכי חזק), recounts the many times that God saved the Jewish people. The hymn retells Jewish history in poetic form and celebrates deliverance from four ancient enemies, Pharaoh, Nebuchadnezzar, Haman, and Antiochus. In the first stanza, it says that God saved us during the times when the enemies are about to slaughter us, and this is when we rededicated the altar, a reference to the festival Hanukkah. The melody of this piece, according to Cantor Birnbaum of Konigsberg, is adapted from the old German folk-song "So weiss ich eins," and has been widely spread among German Jews as early as 1450. It has become tradition to sing the first verse of this song after lighting the Hanukkah candles. G. Shrem
כתר
Ajam 203 167 שיר אגיד Alludes to the ten sefirot that God used to create the world. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שמחים
Ajam 205 168 מלך רחמן Raphael Tabbush Melekh Rahman (AJAM, page 168), or "Merciful King," is considered the ultimate wedding song. It was composed in Aleppo, circa 1897, by H Raphael Tabbush (d. 1918), for his close student, H Moshe Ashear (d. 1940), in honor of his wedding to Salha, the daughter of Mr Yaaqob Shamah. The acrostic is "Moshe" and names of family members (Moshe, Yaaqob, Shaol, Simha, Shelomo) are alluded to. The melody is from the Arabic song "Doom Ya Zaman." There are three stanzas in this song. The first two stanzas are from the point of view of the community; asking God to save the nation, and also to join in the happiness of the Hatan and Kallah on their wedding day. The third stanza, however, is from the view of the Hatan; asking to be blessed with the Blessing of Abraham. For Shabbat Vayesse, this melody can be applied in the prayers for Nishmat. The pizmon can be associated with this perasha, because we read about Jacob's wedding. Moshe Ashear and Family Manuscript G. Shrem
נשמת
Ajam 208 169 איברי יאמרו הב Raphael Tabbush Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G Shrem- Nishmat
נשמת
Ajam 212 171 מקדש בנה בו Shabbat Teruma or Vayaqhel. About building of the temple. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
פזמון
Ajam 213 171 הללו אל יה Raphael Tabbush Maqam Sasgar Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
Ajam 214 172 אני לקראת Raphael Tabbush Engagement or Wedding. Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Ajam 215 173 מקהלות עם Mordechai Abadi Torah or Hatan. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Ajam 217 174 בקול רנה וצהלה Raphael Tabbush For a wedding. Same melody of the pizmon "Kabir Koah." Melody that we have for this song is from the notes of Idelsohn, 1923. Tabbush Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G Shrem - Naqdishakh
Ajam 220 175 אל מלא הנחסר El Male Hanehsar (AJAM, page 175) is a pizmon for the Pesah festival. This song, most probably composed by H Raphael Antebi Tabbush (d. 1918), has the acrostic of God’s name; first the word אהי״ה and then also the name יהו״ה. The song, which starts with “God, who fills the emptiness,” continues to list His attributes and how it relates to the Pesah festival; freeing His nation, settling them, etc. As a result of this kindness, the people give praise to Him (Hallel) and offer him the Pesah sacrifice. The second verse of the song does not allude to Pesah, but rather the day to day life of relying on God; calling out to Him; asking Him not to hold His hand back or delay from performing miracles, because the morning is coming and we, His chosen nation, need help right away. The melody of this song can be applied to El Hahodaot or Rau Banim for services in Maqam AJAM in close proximity to Pesah. G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Ajam 221 176 אלה אלה הבה Raphael Tabbush Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Ajam 224 177 ינון שמו Matan Torah. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Ajam 227 179 רועה נאמן הוא Raphael Tabbush The pizmon "Ro'eh Ne'eman Hu" (AJAM, page 179), translated as "Faithful Shepherd Is He," is a song associated with the festival of Shabuot. It is composed by H Rephael Antebi Tabbush (d. Cairo, 1918), and the acrostic of his name, "Raphael," is spelled out in the song's four stanzas. The melody of this pizmon is adapted from "Salam Affandina" (translated as "Salute of our Lord"); a melody composed by Giuseppe Pugioli. This melody is well known because it was Egypt's national anthem from 1871-1958. The theme of the pizmon is about receiving of the Torah and the importance of it. In the last stanza of this pizmon, it says "Learn from it (the Torah) day by day, and all your days, you will find peace." The song concludes by saying that the way of the Torah will "save you from troubles and your words [of prayer] will be listened to by God." According to the Hazzanut notes of H Moshe Ashear, this pizmon is traditionally used as the PIZMON SEFER TORAH on the first day of Shabuot. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
כתר
Ajam 231 181 שמך יתרומם Raphael Tabbush Maqam Sasgar Hamaoui Manuscript G. Shrem
ממצרים
Lami 233 183 למי יזרח אור ופורקן Moses Ashear Sion Ezra Levy wedding. September 20, 1938. Leaflet G. Shrem
G Shrem 2
קדיש
Ajam 234 186 מי יספר חסדי האל Moses Ashear Hedaya. Alludes to the Ten Sefirot that God used to create the world. It's melody is taken from the 1888 Princeton University song called "The Orange and the Blue." Ashear Manuscript Leaflet G. Shrem
נשמת
Ajam 238 189 מפעלות אלהים חזו Moses Ashear Sam Franco. PS 62 song. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Ajam 242 191 כל עת אליך Moses Ashear Maqam Girkah Naftali Tawil. Arabic is: "Tilet Yamahla Nourha". Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
שמחים
Ajam 243 193 אני בפי אביע Moses Ashear Mizrachi. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
שמחים
Ajam 244 193 בקול רנה גילה וצהלה Moses Ashear Wedding song. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Ajam 253 202 מלכי אתה פודי Murad Maslaton Bar Misvah of Sion Maslaton. G. Shrem
כתר
Ajam 254 203 יאריך ימים על ממלכתו ישראל בן משה Shabbat Shofetim, because it mentions the blessing of longevity for a new king. Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript G Shrem- Nishmat
נשמת
Nahwand 257 207 רצה לשירי Introduction to the following song. G Shrem
שמחים
Nahwand 262.1 208a ירושלים של זהב Naomi Shemer The pizmon "Yerushalayim Shel Zahab" (NAHWAND, page 208A), translated as "Jerusalem of Gold," is an Israeli song written by Naomi Shemer (1930-2004). This song, written in May 1967, became an unofficial second national anthem after Israel won the Six Day War (June 1967) and liberated Jerusalem. It's melody is based on the Basque lullaby "Pello Joxepe." The song originally had 3 stanzas but a fourth one was added after the Six Day War. The theme of the song is about the Jewish people's longing for Jerusalem. There is a stark contrast between the second stanza, which mourns over the sad, dry, and empty streets, and the amended fourth stanza, which celebrates the return to Jerusalem with happy streets full of life. Some say that the timing of the composition of this song is nothing short of prophetic. The melody of this song made its way to synagogue services and is usually heard transposed to various pieces of prayer around Yom Yerushalayim (28 Iyar). G Shrem
שמחים
Nahwand 265 210 אתה אל כביר Raphael Tabbush The initials at the beginning of each stanza form the acrostic 'Ani Refael'. The song talks about Israel's redemption. The beginning of the pizmon has the composer turning to God to ask for mercy. The composer says that he will not stop praying until his prayers are accepted. He prays for the redemption of the Jewish people, the gathering of the exile, and returning to the Land of Israel. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem
נשמת
Nahwand 266 210 לעיר חנה דורשה דודי Raphael Tabbush G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נשמת
Nahwand 267 211 רם ונעלם אדון עולם Raphael Tabbush Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Nahwand 268 211 תכון לעד G. Shrem
נשמת
Nahwand 270 212 רננות שירו אחי Raphael Tabbush Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
שמחים
Nahwand 271 213 אחזה בנועם Raphael Tabbush "Ehze BeNoam" (NAHWAND, page 213), translated as "I will gaze at the pleasantness of Your face," is a song written by master composer, H Raphael Antebi Tabbush (d. 1918). The 6 stanzas of the song form the acrostic: "Ani Refael" (אני רפאל). Though a favorite at the Shabbat afternoon Sebbits, this melody is almost never applied to any of the pieces of prayers. This composition describes what the author envisions he will do once he leaves the exile; dwelling in the House of the Lord, bowing in the holy sanctuary, and offering the burnt sacrifice in the Temple. He then asks for the Blessing of Abraham and not to be humiliated while in exile. He continues by asking for God to hasten the redemption for the Jewish nation. The battered Jewish nation, at times, feels "chained" (עגונים) in their exile, but finds comfort in their study of the Torah. The author asks God to accept the praises and songs of His beloved nation, because He is a merciful God that forgives transgressions and is eternally kind. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
פזמון
Nahwand 273 214 למה הקץ נסתם נא Raphael Tabbush This pizmon, written in the 19th century by Refael Antebi, is based on a very popular Arabic (Egyptian) song of the times. This pizmon is commonly sung on Shabbat. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Nahwand 274 214 יה נחלה המצחה Raphael Tabbush G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Nahwand 275 215 אודך אודך Raphael Tabbush Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שמחים
Nahwand 276 215 רעיוני יחיד Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Nahwand 278 216 רחום אתה Raphael Tabbush "Rahum Ata" (NAHWAND, page 216) is composed by H Rephael Tabbush (Aleppo, ~1830 - Cairo, 1918), author of the "Shir Ushbaha" pizmonim book (1888). According to the notes of H Moshe Ashear, this song is reserved for Shabbat Beshalah (Shabbat Shira), and the Seventh Day of Pesah. There are 4 stanzas in this pizmon; corresponding to ר-פ-א-ל. The melody of this pizmon is called "Bafta Hindi," and can be applied to Mimisrayim on weeks of Maqam NAHWAND. "Merciful are You for redeeming us from captivity," the pizmon opens; referring to the captivity of slavery under Pharaoh. The second verse is a prayer to redeem us now and to send Eliahu the Prophet to herald the redemption. After we hear of the redemption, the third verse says that we will sing praises to God. The fourth verse mentions how on the seventh day after the Exodus, God rescued our nation by overpowering nature and splitting the Red Sea. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Nahwand 279 216 יחיד רם חי לעולם Isaac Abadi Dahab Turkish melody. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Nahwand 284 220 מלך רם Moses Ashear The pizmon “Melekh Ram” (NAHWAND, page 220), which translates as “Exalted King,” is a very popular song composed by H Moshe Ashear (acrostic: משה). It was composed in honor of the wedding of Mr. Joseph Ezra Tawil (alluded to in the third paragraph). Prominently mentioned in this song are Joseph’s three brothers: Abraham, Shaul, and Mordekhai Tawil; distinguished leaders of Congregation Magen David of Bensonhurst in the 1920’s. This individual, Joseph, ended up moving permanently to Mexico for business opportunities. In this song, we praise God for being the “Exalted King,” and we ask Him to send a savior and redeemer to his chosen nation. We also ask for God to raise our fortunes (with many happy occasions such as weddings) and return His children to their borders so that they can sing and praise Him for all eternity. The melody of this is from a “Chopin March." This melody is popularly applied to Shav’at Aniyim when praying in Maqam NAHWAND. Ashear Manuscript Photograph of Shaul, Joseph and Abraham Tawil G. Shrem
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Nahwand 285 220 אהלל ואביע Moses Ashear "Ahallel Veabia" (NAHWAND, page 220), a pizmon associated with the festival of Shabuot, is composed by H Moshe Ashear (1877-1940). There are fifteen stanzas in this pizmon; all rhyming with one another. The acrostic of the pizmon is "Anokhi Hashem Elohekha, Lo Tahmod Asher Lere'ekha" (אנכי ה׳ אלהיך לא תחמד אשר לרעך); referring to the first and tenth commandments, respectively. The melody of this pizmon is called “Izmir Sefasi”; named after Izmir, Turkey. This pizmon is a poetic rendition of the narrative in Exodus 19 and 20; the narrative that discusses Israel's preparation, receiving, and acceptance of the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai. The song concludes with a plea for God to listen to our prayers of returning the Jews to Zion so that they can live there in peace. The melody of this pizmon is traditionally applied to Halleluya (Psalm 150) on Shabuot, as well as on Shabbat Yitro and Shabbat Vaethanan. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
הללויה
Nahwand 286 222 מלך אב רם Moses Ashear In honor of the birth of Joseph Bijou. Written by M. Ashear. Arabic is "Ya Dounia Ya Gharami", by Abdel Wahab. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem: Haleluyah
G. Shrem
הללויה
Nahwand 287 223 יעלוזו ביה Moses Ashear Shabot. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Nahwand 289 225 מה עצמו Moses Ashear Wedding of Selim and Nizha Gindi. Photograph is courtesy of David Catton, grandson. Ashear Manuscript Photograph of Selim and Nizha Gindi G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Nahwand 293 228 יה לו אעתיר Moses Ashear Wedding of Shelomo Harra; April 14, 1935. Leaflet G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Nahwand 299 236 כל עוד בלבב פנימה Naftali Imber Israel National Anthem. G. Shrem
G Shrem- HaTiqvah
G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Nahwand 299.01 237a מלכי צורי אל כביר Haim S Aboud G. Shrem
G. Shrem
299.14 Oh How We Danced Gabriel A Shrem Maqam Nahwand Al Jolson Anniversary Song G. Shrem- Va'ani Tefilati
G. Shrem
ואני תפלתי
Bayat 300 238 יחיד רם Raphael Tabbush First song at all Sebets. The initials at the beginning of each stanza form the acrostic 'Yosef'. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
פזמון
Bayat 302 239 נורא ורם Raphael Tabbush The pizmon incorporates the poet's name and hints at the shortest prayer in the Bible, "El na Refah na Lah", "Oh God, pray heal her now" (Numbers 12:13). The Text of this pizmon calls of God to "heal my sickness and pain". The pizmon also asks God to banish the "son of Hagar". Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Bayat 303 239 יהי נא לן נחת Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Bayat 305 240 יפת עין Ezra Attiah Siman "Yeshaya". Yeshaya is the name of his father. Pizmon for Abi HaBat. G. Shrem
נשמת
Bayat 306 241 אל יצרת Raphael Tabbush Aseret Yeme Teshubah. Can be used for Shabbats of Maqam Bayat-Hijaz. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem - Qedusha
G. Shrem
Bayat 308 242 יה אלי מהר Raphael Tabbush Title in Red Book of "Abd Al Ekhoua" is incorrect. The actual title is “min abli mah ahwah algamal.” G. Shrem
נשמת
Bayat 311 243 שבחו אל רוממו Hatan/Kallah. British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נשמת
Bayat 319 246 מעזי אז כלה קץ Raphael Tabbush “Mauzi,” or “My Fortress” (BAYAT, page 246), is a song that is very popular. H Raphael Tabbush is likely the author of this pizmon, but this is uncertain. The melody of this song is from the Arabic song “Baladi Askara Min Araf il Lama.” This song is associated with the Shalosh Regalim festivals due to a brief reference to them. The melody of this pizmon is typically applied to Shav’at Aniyim for weeks of Maqam BAYAT. Despite this being a song for the most happy of holidays, this song is actually very sad. It asks why has God abandoned us and why has the Messiah not yet arrived? It describes how our enemies have taken over our vineyards and have killed us. The climax of the song, “Al Damam,” describes how “my tears fall on their blood" (the blood of fellow Jews) and how our tears are enough to fill rivers. The four verse piece concludes with an open question: “Where has my Beloved gone; to Whom I rejoice three times a year?” Commentary on Pizmon G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Bayat 326 249 ארוממך Simhat Torah. Many themes are in this pizmon including: redemption, bringing us to the time when we made pilgrimages tot eh Temple, to have mercy on Israel in exile. The Torah is mentioned throughout. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
ממצרים
Bayat 328 252 אנא קץ לי Nissim Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Bayat 333 255 ידידי השכחת Matan Torah. G. Shrem
קדיש
Bayat 337 258 ידי אשא לדבירך יוסף חזק Mossaei Shalosh Regalim. Attiah Manuscript Yabess Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
ראו בנים
Bayat 340 260 בעדי יה בעדי Moses Ashear Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Bayat 343 263 מה יפו לי פעמיך Moses Ashear Bijou. Ashear Manuscript Shrem and Cabby
Bayat 344 264 מענה לשון Moses Ashear Safdieh. Ashear Manuscript Shrem and Cabby
הללויה
Bayat 346 266 אל מאד נעלה Moses Ashear The pizmon “El Meod Na’ala” (BAYAT, page 266) is one of the most famous compositions written by cantor H Moshe Ashear (1877-1940). This was written in honor of the groom Mr Elie J Gindi (born in 1900, Syria) for his wedding (circa 1924 in Brooklyn, NY). The acrostic of the pizmon is “Eliah Moshe” with the first word of each of the three stanzas spelling “Eliah” and the second word of each stanza spelling “Moshe.” The names of the bride’s father, Moses (Attieh), and the bride, Rachel, are alluded to in the first and third stanza’s respectively. The melody of this pizmon is from polka music from Istanbul, Turkey. In the prayers, this melody is commonly applied to Semehim on weeks of Maqam BAYAT. This song is also traditionally used as the PIZMON SEFER TORAH for Shabbat Shemot because of it mentioning Moshe and Aharon, two important people introduced in this Torah portion. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
שמחים
Bayat 350 268 'הללו את ה Moses Ashear Matan Torah. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Bayat 357 274 אות אלף מאלפת א''ב Aleph Bet Song. Attiah Manuscript Shrem Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Yabess Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Bayat 358 276 אל דורשה נפשי Raphael Tabbush Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Bayat 359 276 אבי כחותם שימני Shrem Manuscript G. Shrem
נקדישך
Bayat 360 277 יוצר אדמה Bar Misvah. British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Bayat 362 278 אל נעלה רפא Moses Ashear Eli Ashear Bar Misvah. Kislev 1929. Leaflet G. Shrem
קדיש
Bayat 363 280 שובי העדי Moses Ashear Written May 26, 1940. Song in memory of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yohai, for Lag LaOmer. Leaflet G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G. Shrem
כתר
Bayat 372 292 דברי שירתי- מגן בעדי Moses Ashear In honor of birth of Moshe Ashear's grandson. December 10, 1937. Shrem Manuscript Leaflet G. Shrem
ראו בנים
Bayat 375 296 מרום יחיד Moses Ashear Joseph Isaac Shalom Bar Misvah. Kislev 1930. Leaflet Photograph of Isaac Shalom G. Shrem
נקדישך
Bayat 376 297 מאל עליון Moses Ashear Joseph Isaac Shalom Bar Misvah. Kislev 1930. Leaflet Isaac and Alice Shalom Family G. Shrem
Bayat 377 298 לך קראתי יה Moses Ashear G. Shrem
Bayat 381 302 שבחך אני אגידה Ezra Mishaniye Composed by Hakham Ezra Mishaniye for Nissim Franco, Hazzan of Congregation Magen David and subsequently Shaare Zion (Brooklyn, New York), for the occasion of the Bar Misvah of his son, Steve Franco (yeshaya) . It is sung to the Arabic melody of ANI MANI RAYISAH. Can be applied to Odecha or Keter. Bar Misvah on January 19, 1950. Leaflet Photograph of Nathan Nissim Franco G. Shrem
כתר
Bayat 388 312 שירו שיר חדוה Ezekiel Hai Albeg Benjamin Becker (Red Book) or Albert Levy (Mizmor Shir Book) Bar Misvah. Shrem and Cabby
נשמת
Azharot 391.094 A2 אמון יום זה An introduction to the Azharot by Ribbi David Ben El'azar Baqoudah G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Mehayar-Bayat 397 323 יה מתנשא Moses Ashear Meyer Salem wedding. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Mehayar-Bayat 398 324 מלכי יוצרי Moses Ashear Composed by H Moshe Ashear in honor of the wedding of Ezra Moshe and Nahmo Azar Cohen, on February 25, 1925. Photographs courtesy of descendents Jack and Ezra Azar. Ashear Manuscript Wedding of Ezra and Nahmo Azar 2-25-1925 Photograph of Ezra Moshe and Nahmo Azar G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Mehayar-Bayat 400 326 ממלכות הארץ Moses Ashear Abadi wedding. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Mehayar-Bayat 401 327 יה החישה ותנה לי Moses Ashear Kassin wedding. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Mehayar-Bayat 403 328 מדבש ונפת צוף Moses Ashear Written pre 1928 in honor of Ma'oz Laebyon. Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Hoseni 406.01 332 יפעתך תמה Traditionally used at the wedding ceremony. G. Shrem
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem 3
Hoseni 407 333 משמחי לב Each stanza ends with the name "David." Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
קדיש
Hoseni 408 334 דודי אתן דוד חזק Attiah Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript Yabess Manuscript British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Hoseni 409 334 דעת ומזמה דוד חזק This pizmon, entitled “Knowledge and Discretion” (HOSENI, page 334), is a very sacred song in Aleppo tradition reserved for Matan Torah, the giving of the Ten Commandments. This song pre-dates most other pizmonim in our tradition; being older than 1850. The opening verse says “Knowledge, discretion, and words of wisdom; more than them, on the day Moses spoke; her (Wisdom’s) profit is greater than fine gold; this is the Law that Moses place.” There are a total of eight stanza’s in the original manuscripts; all ending with the word “Moshe,” and each phrase, containing rich biblical allusions, rhyme with one another. The acrostic of this pizmon, “David Hazaq,” indicates that the first name of the author is David, but his specific identity is unknownto us. The melody of the pizmon is from the Arabic song “Tazri Bel Ajafen,” and is only applied for Naqdishakh three times a year: Shabbat Yitro, Shabbat Kallah (the Shabbat prior to the Shabuot festival), and Shabbat Vaethanan. Attiah Manuscript Yabess Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript Commentary on Pizmon British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Hoseni 410 335 מלא משאלות לבי מרדכי Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Yabess Manuscript G. Shrem
נשמת
Hoseni 413 337 אשרי האיש יודע שמי Classified also as Maqam NAWAH. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
נשמת
Hoseni 416 339 יה חסדך גלי Raphael Tabbush Aseret Yeme Teshuba. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Hoseni 417 340 אל הנאזר בגבורתיה Raphael Tabbush Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Hoseni 420 342 יחיד ומיוחד G Shrem
כתר
Hoseni 423 344 בחר דודי Raphael Tabbush Matan Torah. Lists the Ten Commandments. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Hoseni 424 345 אוחיל יום יום אני דוד בר אהרן בר חסין חזק Maqam Kourd Original older version of the song; written by R' David Hassin chiefly about Tiberias and the new resettlement efforts in Israel. Talks about the holiness of the Land of Israel and its Rabbis. Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Yabess Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
כתר
Hoseni 425 348 יהיו כמוץ Israel Najara Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Hoseni 427 350 אשים תהלה G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Hoseni 430 353 אמרי פי והגיוני אברהם Maqam Hoseni or Tahir. Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Yabess Manuscript G. Shrem
שמחים
Hoseni 430.2 568b ויהי בימי שפט השפטים From Megilat Ruth applied to Mimisrayim (Hoseni). G. Shrem
G. Shrem- Mimisrayim- Megilat Ruth
ממצרים
Ashiran 432 355 בני בגילך Moses Ashear Bar Missva. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Rahawi Nawah 434 358 מגן אל צורי Moshe Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Rahawi Nawah 435 358 מעלפת ספירים Mordechai Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Rahawi Nawah 436 359 אמונים ערכו שבח אהרן כהן Emunim (RAHAW, page 359), or "The Faithful," is an important Sephardic hymn for Pesah; specifically for the Leil HaSeder. It can be found in Mahzor Aram Soba (1527), making it one of our oldest pizmonim still in active transmission. It has the acrostic of "Aharon Kohen." Each of the 7 stanzas end with the words "Va'amartem Zebah Pesah..." (ואמרתם זבח פסח); referring to the commandment mentioned in Exodus 12:27 to offer the Qorban Pesah to God. Other Missvot relating to Pesah are also referred to, such as, eating Massa and Maror, drinking the four cups of wine, and retelling of the story of the exodus from Egypt (ending with receiving the Torah). The last verse ends "Your doings are wondrous; Your miracles are powerful; all those who seek refuge in You will say 'It is good to take refuge in the Lord' (Psalm 118:8)." The hymn is traditionally sung at the Seder in the Magid portion, and the melody of this hymn is applied to the prayers for Semehim of Shabbat Hagadol, and Naqdishakh of Ereb Pesah. Mahzor Aram Soba 1527 Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Yabess Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem
שמחים
Rahawi Nawah 437 360 מלך המפואר משה חזק Rahawi. Rosh Hashana, but also may be used for Pesah. Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Yabess Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem
שמחים
Rahawi Nawah 438 361 בנה לי זבול משכני רפאל חזק Pesah melody. Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Yabess Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Rahawi Nawah 439 361 מי ימלל Mordechai Abadi This pizmon, (Maqam NAWAH, page 361), is composed by H Mordekhai Abadi (Aleppo, 1826, - Jerusalem, 1884), author of "Dibre Mordekhai," and other Halakha responsa. There are a total of 5 stanzas in this pizmon; corresponding to מ-ר-ד-כ-י. "Who can recount the strengths and wonders of the most perfect and wise?" the poem begins, and then proceeds to list the miracles that God orchestrated as the Children of Israel leave Egypt. Starting with the third stanza, the 10 plagues that occurred in Egypt are poetically described. In the last verse, after the festival of Pesah is mentioned, there is a reference to the belief that Pesah, a time of a previous redemption, will be the season in the future when "we will be redeemed." As per the Hazzanut notes of H Moshe Ashear, this song is reserved for Shabbat Bo and Shabbat Hagadol. The Ades synagogue in Jerusalem, however, has a tradition of using this song one week earlier on Shabbat Vaera. Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Rahawi Nawah 440 363 יצא למלוך מבית סורים ישראל בר משה בר לוי חזק This pizmon (NAWA, page 363), is a retelling of the Joseph story (Genesis 39-41) in poetic form based on classical Midrash sources. This piece by H Israel Najara (1555-1625) has the acrostic: Israel Bar Moshe Bar Levi Hazaq. There are 16 stanzas in this poem and as a rule, the first three phrases of each stanza rhyme with the last phrase of the preceding stanza (AAAB- BBBC- CCCD etc). The last two stanzas of this poem indicate that the story of Joseph is a source of inspiration for our people; a people who experienced the hardships of poverty (אביון) and oppression (עבד) throughout the ages. The last stanza is the call for redemption of the nation and the hope that God will raise us just like He raised Joseph from the dust of poverty to the power of royalty. According to H Moshe Ashear, this song is traditionally applied for Semehim or Mimisrayim on Shabbat Vayesheb or as a Pizmon Sefer Torah for Shabbat Miqes. Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Rahawi Nawah 441 365 דר רומה Shabbat Vayera. A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Rahawi Nawah 443 367 שמרתני וחיתני Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Rahawi Nawah 445 368 מתי תשיר Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Rahawi Nawah 446 368 רם לי יה רם לי Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Rahawi Nawah 447 369 אל בנה נא G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נקדישך
Rahawi Nawah 448 370 מפי אל מפי אל א״ב Maqam Girkah Simhat Torah. Hamaoui Manuscript Attiah Manuscript Yabess Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Rahawi Nawah 449 371 סלח סלח אהרן הכהן חזק Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שמחים
Rahawi Nawah 450 372 אודך אל טובות Raphael Tabbush Hanukkah song. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Rahawi Nawah 451 373 גואלך גואלך Moses Ashear G. Shrem
G. Shrem
451.2 Sample- Nawah Maqam Rahawi Nawah G. Shrem
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem
דוגמא
Saba 452 375 עליון רם גדול Ezra Attia Manuscript British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
נשמת
Saba 453 376 יהלל לאל נורא Raphael Tabbush Acrostic 'Yizhak'. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
נשמת
Saba 459 381 נורא תתן כח לי Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
קדיש
Saba 466 385 יומא טבא דרבנן Yeshaya Bar Misvah. G. Shrem
Saba 467 385 רם אמור Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
Saba 470 387 למן אתפלל למן Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript G. Shrem
Saba 471 388 בנין מעוני תמהר Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
Saba 473 389 יה אלי צור משגבי Raphael Tabbush Shabbat Zakhor, Ki Tisa, Ki Tesse. Hamaoui Manuscript British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G Shrem
Saba 474 391 אני לשמך מלין אחביר Raphael Tabbush Tabbush Manuscript G Shrem
I Cabasso
נקדישך
Saba 481 397 יה אל גדול ונאדר Tu Bishvat/ Baqashot. The text of this song has nothing to do with Tu Bishvat except for the references to inviting guests to eat different fruits. The reason why this tune is used for Tu Bishvat is based on a Judeo-Arabic song with the same tune as this. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
שמחים
Saba 484 399 יה הוריד נא Hamaoui Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ממצרים
Saba 485 400 אל בידו אליהו חזק "El Beyado Yado Yado," (SABA, page 400) translated as "God, with His hand, will redeem Israel his servant" is used to herald the month of Nisan, the month of redemption, and the Pesah festival. The acrostic of this song is "Eliahou Hazaq" (אליהו חזק); referring to Eliahou HaNabi, the one who will announce the redemption. The author of this song is most probably H Raphael Antebi Tabbush from Aleppo, Syria. The melody of this is from the Arabic song "Hai Kardo Kardo." Originally, there were two separate texts written for this melody; one entitled "Beyado" (not discussing the month of Nisan) and the other called "El Beyado." Eventually, the author merged the two songs into one; retaining the first stanza of the "Beyado" song (אהבתיך צור ידידי) and putting it into the holiday-oriented "El Beyado" song. This pizmon can be sung as PIZMON SEFER TORAH on the Shabbat prior to Rosh Hodesh Nisan, and the melody of this pizmon, as per H Isaac Cabasso, can be applied to Mimisrayim on Shabbat Hagadol. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem
כתר
Saba 490 403 אל חי ונורא Abraham Shabbat Bereshit. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Saba 491 404 ערבים שבת אחים G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Saba 494 409 אהלל ואגילה Milah Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Saba 495 410 אתה אהובי Abraham I Antebi Ata Ahubi (SABA, page 410), translated as "You are my Beloved," is the first song heard in a young boy's life; at his Berit Milah at eight days old. Composed by the illustrious H Abraham I Antebi (1765-1858), Chief Rabbi of Aleppo, the song has the acrostic "Abraham Hazaq." Each of the 6 stanzas end with the word "Eyn," meaning eye. In the first stanza, the author thanks God for "Him giving happiness in my heart" and is comforted that "in You, I can lean." The next four stanzas refer to the Berit Milah, the covenant between God and Abraham, and allude to some of its festive rituals. The last stanza, in the original version of the song, states "Strengthen Aram Soba (Aleppo), the good city, and also the [resting] place of the master, Ezra [HaSofer], a fine pearl that the eye shall see." In later publications, in an attempt to standardize the song, this last stanza was altered to remove the references to Aleppo. This melody is applied to Naqdishakh preceding a Berit Milah as well as on Shabbat Lekh Lekha and Tazria. Attiah Manuscript Yabess Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Shire Zimrah, Algiers, 1889 G. Shrem
נקדישך
Saba 496 411 מה טוב מה נעים Mordechai Abadi Milah Abraham Sitehon Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Saba 501 415 חיש משגבי Raphael Tabbush "Hish Misgabi" (SABA, page 415) is a pizmon composed by H Raphael Antebi Tabbush in honor of Purim. It has been said by Rabbi Aaron Hamaoui of Boston that H Raphael Antebi Tabbush (d. 1918) was blind in his later years, and he needed his students to assist him to walk in the shuq, market, in Syria. One day, as he was walking, he heard the catchy Arabic melody “Hisbi Rabi“ being chanted in the market place. H Tabbush then rushed home, and immediately, he dictated words to his student, H Eliahou Hamaoui, the grandfather of Rabbi Aaron Hamaoui, to fit this melody. This ended up being “Hish Misgabi”; a song in honor of Purim. This pizmon has the acrostic “Raphael Hazaq”, and has 5 stanzas (in addition to the first verse, which serves as the chorus). The melody of this pizmon can be applied to Keter or Va’ani Tefilati, but should only be applied in close proximity to Purim. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
כתר
Saba 502 416 אוחיל יום יום Eliahu Hazzan This is a "remake" of the other song with the same title (p.345). In praise of Jerusalem and its prominent place throughout Jewish history. Both songs have the same melody. G. Shrem
Saba 503 417 ידידי רועי מקימי ישראל חזק Yedidi Ro'ee Meqimi (SABA, page 417), whose acrostic is "Yisrael Hazaq," is written by H Israel Najara (1555-1625). This poem compares God to a shepherd who takes care of a flock of sheep. The sheep, mentioned at the end of each stanza, is a metaphor for the people of Israel. It is God, the shepherd, who rescues Israel, the sheep, from her enemies and who will gather a scattered people back to the Holy Land to rebuild the Temple. This relates to the Torah portion of Vayesse due to the reference in the last stanza to Genesis 29:9 when "Rachel comes out with her sheep." When Jacob is a refugee, it isn't until he spotted Rachel that he finds the hope needed to survive. On Shabbat Vayesse, the melody of this pizmon is traditionally applied to Semehim. Although SABA is not the "Maqam of the Week," the Hazzan should switch from AJAM to SABA shortly before Semehim to apply this important melody. Attiah Manuscript Yabess Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
שמחים
Saba 504 418 איש אלהים קדוש הוא Ben Ish Hai Lag LaOmer. For R' Shimon Bar Yochai. Written by the "Ben Ish Hai" of Babel in the 19th century. Song is an acrostic (Aleph Bet) and has many allusions to the life of R' Shimon. Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
כתר
Saba 505 422 אנה אלך מרוחך ישראל Attiah Manuscript Yabess Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Saba 507 423 רעיה את שירי Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
Saba 508 423 עזי עזי Ezekiel Hai Albeg G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Saba 511 427 רצני אהוב Ezra Dweck and Gabriel Shrem In honor of Hakham Baruch Ben-Haim when his son, Eli Ben Haim was born. Also, a song for the month of Nissan. Leaflet Photograph of H Barukh Ben Haim G. Shrem Part 1
G. Shrem Part 2
G. Shrem 2
G. Shrem
Shrem and Cabby
הללויה
Sigah 518 435 אתה מרום Shalosh Regalim. Not clear if should be classified as Sigah. Some say Maqam Kuzam. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
קדיש
Sigah 520 436 עורי כלה Acrostic: Ezra. British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
נקדישך
Sigah 522 438 מלך רם ונשא Moshe Ashkenazi Tabbush Manuscript British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
פזמון
Sigah 527 442 הימי סתמי Raphael Tabbush Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Sigah 528 443 אל יצרני לעמל Raphael Tabbush Maqam Awj-Oj G. Shrem
נשמת
Sigah 529 443 מצפה לזמן Raphael Tabbush Maqam Awj-Oj G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Sigah 536 447 אדיר ונורא Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
קדיש
Sigah 540 449 ארך זמני Pesah association. G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Sigah 541 450 קץ ימין יפרח יציץ G. Shrem
Sigah 542 451 יחיד אל דגול מרבבה This pizmon (SIGAH, page 451) is composed by H Yeshaya Sutton Rabia, a mid-nineteenth century Aleppo rabbi who composed many pizmonim. The acrostic of the song is Yeshaya, and it contains four rhyming stanzas. It is possibly written in honor of an "Ezra Shalom," whose name is alluded to in the third stanza. The song intends to give praise to an important person, such as a Rabbi. Here is a translation: "Only God stands out in the tens of thousands; He will bless this big man; the one my soul likes; with love and much endearment. The Lord will bless him and protect his arrival and departure; the whole nation goes out to greet him and exclaim to him "welcome." Above will exalt his fortune, and He will be a help to him; His good treasure will be open to him, and he will merit a good ending. God will bless his efforts, years of life will be added for him, peace will be placed in his borders, because he will have a high wall." When praying in Maqam SIGAH, this melody can be applied to "Befi Yesharim." Hamaoui Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Shir Ushbaha, 1921 British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
בפי ישרים
Sigah 544 452 יברך החתן Maqam Awj-Oj Hatan. Hamaoui Manuscript Attiah Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Sigah 545 452 אגילה אגילה Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Sigah 547 454 אל רם חסין יה G. Shrem
Sigah 548 455 אל עוז נאזר G. Shrem
Sigah 549 455 אליך לבי נמס G. Shrem
Sigah 552.2 458 אל חי אל חי  G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Sigah 554 459 אברך את אלעזר Maqam Iraq Purim. This is the first pizmon that Gabriel A. Shrem has learned. Attiah Manuscript Sassoon Manuscript #647 Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript Shire Zimrah, Algiers, 1889 A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
שמחים
Sigah 555 460 אלי צור ישועתי "My God, the Rock of my Salvation; Why have you abandoned me?" is a translation of the first line of the pizmon "Eli Sur Yeshuati" (SIGAH, page 460); considered the flagship song of Purim. The author of this pizmon is said to be H David Yaaqob Pardo, although the acrostic written in the older manuscripts is "Asher Ben Yaaqob Hazaq." The song featured in most current pizmonim books is incomplete- only containing 5 stanzas; corresponding to the first five letters of the alphabet (אבגד״ה). In Aleppo manuscripts from before 1850 (such as Sassoon #647), however, this song has more stanzas. This song, consisting of references from Megillat Esther, contains rhyming sequences within each verse. The thing in common in each stanza is that the last verse always starts with the word "Chai" or life; proclaiming that despite all the hardships that we go through, this is life and God keeps us alive. This melody is applied to Naqdishakh on Shabbat Zakhor and on Purim. Sassoon Manuscript #647 G. Shrem
נקדישך
Sigah 556 462 אל עושה נקמה This pizmon (SIGAH, page 462), whose first words are translated "God who makes revenge," is an entertaining song that retells the miracle of Purim using rhymes. There are a total of 22 stanzas in this piece; corresponding to each letter of the Hebrew alphabet (א״ב). Within a stanza, each clause rhymes with one another, except for the last clause of the stanza, which rhymes with all the previous stanzas. The pizmon, which is classified as Maqam OJ in the older manuscripts, originates from Aleppo and is older than 1850. The author of this piece is uncertain, although there is a possibility that it may be H Raphael Antebi Tabbush. The melody of this pizmon is from the Arabic "Ya Dini Yeaman," and is typically applied to Shavat Aniyim on Shabbat Zakhor, and to El Hahodaot on Purim itself. The song concludes with a prayer for redemption; to give good things to the Jewish nation in order to raise their spirits. Hamaoui Manuscript Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Sigah 557 464 אור גילה Raphael Tabbush Purim. A song of praise and thanksgiving for God's deliverance of the Jews from Haman. The pizmon, by Refael Antebi (19th century), has allusions to the Megillah as well its midrashim. The Jews got saved from the evil decree after prayers. Shir Ushbaha, 1921 A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Sigah 558 465 תם ונשלם Raphael Tabbush Purim. Shir Ushbaha, 1921 G. Shrem
ממצרים
Sigah 563 468 ענני אל במרחב יה Ezra G Shrem - Qaddish
קדיש
Sigah 564 469 מי זאת עולה יפה-פיה מרדכי חזק In honor of the Torah. Alludes to the 10 Sefirot. Yabess Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
ה' מלך
Sigah 565 470 יה אל לך אהללה Ezekiel Hai Albeg In honor of Gabriel A Shrem, cantor of Congregation Magen David of 67th Street. Photograph of Gabriel and Rachel Shrem Five Generations of Shrem Uncles (2013) Photograph of 5 generations of Shrem Family (2013) G Shrem Interview
פזמון
565.3 מי כמוך ואין כמוך Maqam Sigah Mi Khamocha for Shabbat Zachor G. Shrem
Hijaz 569 475 יחלצון Maqam Shehnaz Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נשמת
Hijaz 571 476 אל רם נורא ואיום Raphael Tabbush Maqam Shehnaz Yom Kippur. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G Shrem- Semehim
שמחים
Hijaz 574 478 רבת שבעה Raphael Tabbush High Holidays. Borrows the melody of the Spanish song "Mis Hermanos" ("My Brothers"). Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G Shrem
G Shrem
נקדישך
Hijaz 575 479 עזרני אל חי High Holidays. Arabic is "Ya Farid El Hosn Ashaq Gamalak." Sung here by Mounirah Al Mahdeya. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
G Shrem- including Qaddish
G Shrem
שועת עניים
Hijaz 582 483 יחיד נא Raphael Tabbush The initials at the beginning of each stanza form the acrostic 'Refael'. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Hijaz 583 484 מהונך תעשר Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
Hijaz 585 485 רוכב עבים Raphael Tabbush Shemini Asseret. G. Shrem
שועת עניים
Hijaz 586 485 יה גאלי צרים Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Hijaz 587 486 אם חכם לבך בני Abraham I Antebi The pizmon, "Eem Hakham" (HIJAZ, page 486), is composed by H Abraham Isaac Antebi (1765-1858), the former Chief Rabbi of Aleppo (starting 1817), and composer of many pizmonim. This pizmon is first found in his book "Ohel Yesharim," published in 1843, and has been included in most handwritten manuscripts of this time period. Many of Antebi's books had the word "Ohel" in it, because this Rabbi witnessed a massive earthquake in Aleppo causing most of the city to become refugees and live in tents ("ohel"). The content of this pizmon is a letter from a father to his son (on his wedding day) asking him to follow his advice on how he should live his life and bestowing him with the many blessings of Abraham and Isaac. This father tells his son that while he should always pursue wisdom and sciences, he should always "know" the God of his forefathers. The melody of this pizmon is from the Arabic song "Ya Sukri Yabu il Shemat." This melody can be applied to El Hahodaot on weeks of Maqam HIJAZ. Attiah Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript Mosseri-Kozli Manuscript British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
קדיש
Hijaz 588 487 עליון על כל רמים Shabbat Hazon. Ezra Attia Manuscript Abraham Sitehon Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נשמת
Hijaz 590 488 אור הנעלם א''ב Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
כתר
Hijaz 591 490 שמח נפשי Shelomo Hazaq Arabic is : Qado Kal Mayas. G. Shrem
ממצרים
Hijaz 593 491 ישיר ישראל Israel Najara Maqam Shehnaz G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Hijaz 594 492 רנו גילו Raphael Tabbush This pizmon (HIJAZ, page 492), composed by H Raphael Antebi Tabbush, is a song written for Purim. Unlike other Purim songs, most of which are in Maqam SIGAH, this song is classified as Maqam HIJAZ; a maqam typically reserved for sad occasions. The acrostic of this piece is "Raphael Hazaq," and consists of 5 stanzas; corresponding to the letters of the author's name. Each stanza is followed by the chorus which begins with the words "Zekher Sadiq Yarum Hodo" etc. The song opens on a happy note ("Proclaim joy and rejoice all creations"); calling onto all the creations of the world to recognize the miracle of Purim. The middle of the pizmon is about the hard times and suffering that Haman put the Jews through ("the enemy conspired to be the head"). The last stanza ends on a hopeful note; calling for the Messiah and the rebuilding of the Temple so that we can offer sacrifices again. The melody of this song is applied to either Naqdishakh on Purim or Keter on Shabbat Zakhor. Tabbush Manuscript G. Shrem
נקדישך
Hijaz 595 493 בואו נספר Hoshana Raba. Yabess Manuscript A Z Idelsohn notes, 1923 G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Hijaz 596 494 מרומי ברך Moses Ashear In honor of Hebrat Qahal Qadosh Magen David. This was "The Song" that he made for the inauguration and the song that stuck as the Magen David Theme Song. G. Shrem
שמחים
Hijaz 598 496 יה לגני בא נא יה Moses Ashear Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Hijaz 602 498 מהר חביבי Moses Ashear Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
G. Shrem
נשמת
Hijaz 604 500 אספר שמך Moses Ashear Ashear Manuscript G. Shrem
Hijaz 605.5 502a מול אלי וגודלו NLevy G. Shrem
Hijaz 606 502a מרום דר מעונה Moses Ashear G. Shrem
Hijaz 610 506 נדה אני Moses Ashear Bar Misvah of Shaul Abraham Houssni. January 1938. Leaflet G. Shrem
קדיש
Hijaz 611.1 514i יום וליל Maqam Shehnaz About the spliting of the Red Sea. Appropriate for Seventh Day of Pesah. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Hijaz 612 510 אליכם קהל עדה Aharon Eliahou The theme of this poem (HIJAZ, page 510) is the deaths of Nadab and Abihu, sons of Aharon, who died on Inauguration Day of the Mishkan. The author is H Aharon Eliahou seen by the acrostic is “Aharon Hazaq” (אהרן חזק). There are seven stanzas in the original poem, all ending with the words “Benei Aharon,” with an extra stanza added by H Ezra Hamway (1859-1945), Chief Judge (Ab Beit Din) of Aleppo. The loss of Nadab and Abihu is viewed as a tragedy and this emotional poem is meant to cause us to cry and repent. The Zohar says (Vayiqra; OH, 621), that whoever grieves over these deaths, his sins will be forgiven, and he will not lose a child in his lifetime. In Aleppo custom, this poem appears in "Siddur Beit Kaporet” with instructions of singing this on Yom Kippur morning before the Torah reading. In addition, this melody is applied to "Semehim" on Kippur morning. Although “Ahare Mot” is referred to in this poem, one must refrain from using this melody on Shabbat Ahare Mot. Handwritten Manuscript G. Shrem
G Shrem- including Semehim
שמחים
Hijaz 612.1 Bilbul Nagah Al LaShata Nil Popular Arabic melody. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
Hijaz 613 512 רשות לברוך שאמר G. Shrem
Ashar Kalimat 620 515 עשרת הדברות ערבית Seadyah Gaon The Ashar Kalimat is a Judeo-Arabic commentary translation of the Decalogue based on Se'adyah Gaon. There are certain individuals who say it at home on the night of Tou Bishbat and there are those who say it in Kenis on Shabbat Shirah during Se’oudat Shelishit (after we began reading Perashat Yitro during Minhah). G Shrem
2102 514j אחות קטנה חלבית Abraham Hazan Girondi Spain, 13th Century, song used to open prayers on Rosh Hashana, hence, opening the new year and concluding the old one. G. Shrem
ה' מלך
2103 ינוב פי ניב ישיח ישראל The piyyut originally before Musaf of Yom Kippur. G. Shrem
הללויה
2104 514v אוחילה לאל אחלה פניו This is also used prior to the Amidah of Musaf on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. G. Shrem
נשמת
2106 514u ישראל עבדיך G. Shrem
G. Shrem
אל ההודאות
2107 בן אדמה Yehuda HaLevi Yom Kippur. G Shrem
קדיש
2108 514k עת שערי רצון Yehuda Samuel Abbas Aleppo, 12th Century, Used on Rosh Hashana before the shofar. The piyyut relates the Akedah of Isaac to the themes of Judgment, and loyalty to Hashem. G. Shrem
שמחים
2109 ירחיק נדוד דוד נעמן ישראל Maqam Hijaz G. Shrem
ממצרים
2110 514u שואף כמו עבד Shelomo Ibn Gabirol Song is meant to be a Reshut for Nishmat for Shaharit of Rosh Hashanah---The song compares us to slaves who must return to serve our master, Hashem. G. Shrem
נקדישך
2111 Unspecified Traditional Melodies G Shrem- HM Kippur
2112 ירושלמית This is the melody that use in Jerusalem for Keter. There is no known pizmon for this melody. G. Shrem
כתר
2113 יצו האל לדל שואל G. Shrem
ואני תפלתי
2115 514r יה שמך ארוממך Yehuda HaLevi Rosh Hashana---Meant to be a Reshut for the Kaddish of Yosser---Meant to recognize the greatness of Hashem. G. Shrem
קדיש
2116 S24 יה שמע אביוניך Yehuda HaLevi Song, which is used in Selihot, discusses the situation of the Jewish people. G. Shrem
ראו בנים
2116.02 דוגמאות מיום הכפורים Sample Yom Kippur Prayers G Shrem
2121 514v עמידה G. Shrem (1/2)
G. Shrem (2/2)
דוגמא
2122 אשם וזע מזדונהו Recited prior to Minha on Yom Kippur. Piyyut has fallen out of use in most congregations. G. Shrem
פיוט
2127 514j חזקו וגילו מאחות קטנה This is the last verse of the above song. that the cantor sings alone. G. Shrem
פיוט
2130 514m אלהי אל תדינני Isaac Ibn Mar Shaul Spain--10th-11th century--- The piyyut, used on Rosh Hashanah, is an alphabetical acrostic, and portrays a person confessing his sins. G. Shrem
פיוט
2131 514o ידי רשים Yehuda HaLevi G. Shrem
פיוט
2132 514o המבורך This is the last verse of the above song that the cantor sings alone. G. Shrem
פיוט
Selihot 2225 582 סליחות Benayahu #131 (Jacob R Mishaan, 1780) Selihot- Recording 1 (1970s)
Haggadah 2300 H2 הגדה Maqam Rahawi Nawah G. Shrem
Haggadah 2302 כי לא נאה Maqam Ajam G. Shrem
Haggadah הגדה H33 מן המצר Maqam Ajam The melody for "Min hamesar" in the Hallel. G. Shrem- Hallel in Ajam
דוגמא
Azharot 2351 A4 אזהרות Solomon Ibn Gabirol Composed by Sephardic Poet H Solomon Ibn Gabirol. Recited on the Shabuot holiday. Day 1- Positive Commandments. Day 2- Negative Commandments. G. Shrem
שמחים
Azharot 2352 A25 כתובה למתן תורה Traditionally read when opening the Torah Ark on the first day of Shabuot. Maqam Hoseni. G. Shrem
2353 שמח בני חתן נעים בן פרת יוסף Maqam Hoseni Arabic melody: רקץ אל באן. Specifically applied to Nishmat on weeks related to Mattan Torah. Hamaoui Manuscript British Library Or. 10375 G. Shrem
G Shrem- Nishmat
נשמת
Minha-Arbit 2385 W5 פטום הקטרת The Qetoret Passage. Mahzor Aram Soba 1560 G Shrem
Minha-Arbit 2386 W7 אשרי יושבי ביתך Ashrei (Psalm 145). Mahzor Aram Soba 1560 G. Shrem: Mahour
G Shrem: Hoseni
G. Shrem: Mahour
I Cabasso- Saba
2800 xxxi Gabriel A Shrem Last Interview Gabriel A Shrem January 9, 1986. Interviewed by Dr Kay Kaufman Shelemay. Gabriel A Shrem Interview
3003 תהלים Maqam Tehillim Maqam Rast for Egyptians, Maqam Nahwand for Syrians. Tehillim, or Psalms, are read during the prayer services. G Shrem Psalm 1
Mishle 3004 משלי Maqam Sigah (but different than Torah). Portions of this book are read during services. Some have a custom of reading this book during Shabuot. The passage "Eshet Hayil," read on Friday night Kiddush, is from this book. G. Shrem
G. Shrem Sample 2
Iyob 3005 איוב Ancient undeveloped Rast. Chapter 1-3:1 (narrative) is read like Megillat Ruth. From 3:2 and onwards is read like Iyob. This book is read on Tisha B'Ab. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Song of Songs 3006 SS1 שיר השירים Maqam Bayat. Read every Friday night. G. Shrem
Ruth 3007 R1 מגילת רות Maqam Hoseni.This book is read on Shabuot. Aleppo Codex- Ruth 1 Aleppo Codex- Ruth 2 Aleppo Codex- Ruth 3 Aleppo Codex- Ruth 4 G. Shrem
Lamentations 3008 L1 מגילת איכה Maqam Ajam. Read on Tisha B'Ab. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Esther 3009 מגילת אסתר Maqam Saba-Mouhayar. Read on Purim. G. Shrem
3010 משנה Maqam Nawah. Some signs were also sometimes used in medieval manuscripts of the Mishnah, but apparently not today. G. Shrem
G. Shrem
Esther 3021 E1 אסתר פרק א Tiqun Esther Chapter 1 G Shrem- Sample Verses
Tehillim 1 1 מזמור א The comparison between the lives of the righteous and the wicked. Aleppo Codex G Shrem Psalm 1
אשרי האיש
Haftarot 4082 P445 הקדמה לקריאת הנביאים Traditional verses recited prior to the reading of the Nebiim. G Shrem
4084 N2 ברוך שאמר G Shrem
4086 N3 כי לה' המלוכה G. Shrem: Sigah
G. Shrem: Hijaz
G. Shrem: Sigah
G Shrem- Rast I
G Shrem- Rast II
G Shrem- Mahour I
G Shrem- Rast Mahour
G Shrem- Ajam I
G Shrem- Ajam II
G Shrem- Nahwand I
G Shrem- Nahwand II
G Shrem- Bayat I
G Shrem- Bayat Hoseni
G Shrem- Hoseni I
G Shrem- Nawah
G Shrem- Saba
G Shrem- Sigah I
G Shrem- Sigah II
G Shrem- Hijaz I
G Shrem- Hijaz II
Yom Kippur (G Shrem)
4860 כביר כח פתח פינו בשיר Maqam Ajam Ashear used this melody a lot for the Qedusha on AJAM days. Nissim Tawil Manuscript G Shrem- Naqdishakh
נקדישך

Pizmonim

Section Pizmon Page Song CommentaryRecordings Application
299.14 Oh How We Danced Maqam Nahwand Al Jolson Anniversary Song G. Shrem- Va'ani Tefilati
G. Shrem
Isaac Cabasso- Rau Banim
ואני תפלתי
2800 xxxi Gabriel A Shrem Last Interview January 9, 1986. Interviewed by Dr Kay Kaufman Shelemay. Gabriel A Shrem Interview
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